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Economic Data & Reports
 

Economic Section

The Embassy's Economic Section monitors the full range of economic relations between the U.S. and the United Kingdom and provides U.S. government agencies with accurate, timely, first-hand information and expert analysis on current economic and financial developments in the U.K. The General Economic Policy Unit maintains regular contact with a variety of British government institutions, American and British business organizations, think-tanks, and non-governmental organizations. The unit follows UK economic policy developments to understand how they will affect U.S. interests, advocates for U.S. economic and business interests in the U.K. and works to explain U.S. economic policies and financial regulations to U.K. audiences.

The U.S. and U.K. enjoy a high degree of cooperation on a broad spectrum of issues. Among the issues tracked by the Economic Section are:

  • Anti-Corruption
  • Aviation and Aerospace
  • Energy, Oil and Gas
  • Financial Services and Financial Regulation
  • Intellectual Property
  • Investment and Investment Disputes
  • Labor Affairs
  • Telecommunications Policies
  • Transportation

The Section’s Environment, Science, Technology, and Health Unit concentrates on building relationships with British scientists, policy makers, and concerned citizens on issues ranging from climate change to pandemic influenza to biotechnology. The unit supports a wide range of U.S. government agencies, including the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, the Centers for Disease Control and NASA, in their international work and advocates U.S. policy in these areas, both with Her Majesty's government and with the British public.

U.S. Government Resources

 Other Resources

 

Foreign Agricultural Service Reports Database

USDA’s Global Agriculture Information Network (GAIN), provides timely information on the agricultural economy, products and issues in foreign countries that are likely to have an impact on the U.S. agricultural production and trade.  To access FAS’ GAIN reports, please click here.

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