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B-2 Visa (Holiday Visa)
 

If you are traveling to the United States as a tourist, you will require a valid B-2 visa. That is unless you are eligible to travel visa free under the Visa Waiver Program, or you are a national of a country which has an agreement with the United States allowing their citizens to travel to the United States without B-2 visas.

The following are some activies that can be conducted on the B-2 visa in addition to tourism

  • Medical Treatment

    Medical Treatment

    • If you are seeking medical treatment in the U.S., the consular officer may ask for further documents at your visa interview, which may include: 

       • Medical diagnosis from a local physician, explaining the nature of the ailment and the reason you need treatment in the U.S. ;

       • Letter from a physician or medical facility in the U.S., stating they are willing to treat your specific ailment and detailing the projected length and cost of treatment (including doctors’ fees, hospitalization fees, and all medical-related expenses).

       • Proof that your transportation, medical, and living expenses in the U.S. will be paid. This may be in the form of bank or other statements of income/savings or certified copies of income tax returns (either yours or the person or organization paying for your treatment).

  • Amateur Entertainer

    Amateur Entertainer

    • If you are an amateur or a member of a group of amateurs performing in a social and/or charitable context, or as a competitor in a talent show or contest, you may be eligible for a B-2 visa, provided you will not be paid for your performance. You may, however, receive expenses incidental to the visit. Although you cannot be paid for your performance, you may be performing where an attendance fees is charged. Provided the fee is just to cover or defray the actual cost of holding the event, or if there is a profit, the money goes to charity rather than a commercial cause, the B-2 visa is still ok.  

      Please note: An amateur is someone who normally performs without remuneration (other than an allotment for expenses). A performer who is normally compensated for performing cannot qualify for a B-2 visa, even if they do not make a living at performing.

  • Amateur Athlete

    Amateur Athlete

    • If you are an amateur athlete or a member of a group of athletes competing in an athletic event for which you will receive no payment, other than incidental expenses, you may be eligible for a B-2 visa.

      Please note: An amateur is someone who normally performs without remuneration (other than an allotment for expenses). An athlete who is normally compensated for performing cannot qualify for a B-2 visa even if they do not make a living at performing.

  • B-2 for a short course of study

    B-2 for a short course of study

    • If your primary purpose of travel is tourism and during your visit you will engage in a course of study for less than 18 hours a week, you may apply for a B-2 visa.  A B-2 visa is also appropriate if the program is recreational or vocational in nature.

      Please note that if you are traveling to the United States to attend seminars or conferences for credit towards a degree, you are not eligible for B-2 visa.  This includes students engaged in an on-line course of study traveling to the United States for academic consultations or to take examinations. 

 

If you believe you qualify for a B-2 visa and you are not eligible to travel visa free under the Visa Waiver Program, click here and follow steps 2–7 to apply for a visa.   

Still have a question?  Click here for further information.